Show simple item record

Our precious coasts: marine pollution, climate change and the resilience of coastal ecosystems

dc.contributor.authorUnited Nations Environment Programme
dc.coverage.spatialGlobal
dc.date.accessioned2016-10-11T20:01:16Z
dc.date.available2016-10-11T20:01:16Z
dc.date.issued2006
dc.identifier.isbn82-7701-041-9
dc.identifier.urihttps://wedocs.unep.org/20.500.11822/7924
dc.descriptionScientists studying reefs that were bleached in the late 1990s by high surface sea temperatures have found a link between recovery rates and the levels of contamination entering coastal waters from developments on the land. The ability of coral reefs to survive in a globally-warming world may crucially depend on the levels of pollution to which they are exposed, new findings indicate. Scientists studying reefs that were bleached in the late 1990s by high surface sea temperatures have found a link between recovery rates and the levels of contamination entering coastal waters from developments on the land. The findings, released at an international marine pollution conference taking place in Beijing, China, have come from a team led by the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP), Nature Seychelles, the environment wing of the Government of the Seychelles, and scientific and government experts from the Netherlands and Norway.
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherUNEP
dc.relation220
dc.rightsPublicen_US
dc.subjectcoastal pollution
dc.subjectecosystem
dc.subjectcoral reefs
dc.subjectmangrove
dc.subjectsea
dc.subjectfisheries management
dc.subjectaquaculture
dc.subject.classificationClimate Change
dc.subject.classificationEcosystem Management
dc.titleOur precious coasts: marine pollution, climate change and the resilience of coastal ecosystems
dc.typeReports and Books
wd.identifier.old-id4140
wd.identifier.sdgSDG 13 - Climate Action
wd.identifier.sdgiohttp://purl.unep.org/sdg/SDGIO_00000047


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record