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dc.contributorEconomy Divisionen_US
dc.contributor.authorUnited Nations Environment Programmeen_US
dc.coverage.spatialGlobalen_US
dc.date.accessioned2019-08-02T17:28:56Z
dc.date.available2019-08-02T17:28:56Z
dc.date.issued1983
dc.identifier.isbn92 807 1059 1en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://wedocs.unep.org/20.500.11822/29043
dc.descriptionThe electric arc furnace and the development of the mini-steel mill, along with direct reduction, has enabled countries to install for themselves steel making capacities for 60 to 70% of the capital cost required for an integrated steel works. Unlike the classical process which needs an annual production capacity of several million tons to be economically viable and competitive, a mini-steel mill can operate efficiently with a small scale as low as 5 t/hour, enabling flexibility. Furthermore, a direct reduction (IDR) plant has a much larger turn down ratio (i.e. the lowest proportion of the installed capacity at which an installation may continue to function in practice) than a blast furnace, although the specific energy consumption may rise.en_US
dc.formatTexten_US
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.relation.ispartofUNEP Industry & Environment Guidelines Seriesen_US
dc.rightsPublicen_US
dc.subjectMININGen_US
dc.subjectIRON OREen_US
dc.subjectAIR POLLUTIONen_US
dc.subjectWATER POLLUTIONen_US
dc.subjectNOISE CONTROLen_US
dc.subjectSOLID WASTE MANAGEMENTen_US
dc.subjectHEALTHen_US
dc.subjectIRON AND STEEL INDUSTRYen_US
dc.subjectENVIRONMENTAL ASPECTSen_US
dc.subjectSTEELen_US
dc.titleEnvironmental Guidelines for the Direct Reduction Route to Steel Makingen_US
dc.typeManuals, Guides and Toolkitsen_US
wd.identifier.sdgSDG 3 - Good Health and Well-beingen_US
wd.tagsIndustryen_US
wd.tagsManufacturingen_US
wd.tagsPollutionen_US
wd.topicsChemicals and Pollution Actionen_US
wd.topicsFinance and Economic Transformationsen_US
wd.identifier.pagesnumber21 pagesen_US


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